Lockheed Martin Demonstrates LRASM’s Surface Launch Capabilities

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Naval Defense Industry News - USA
 
 
 
Lockheed Martin Demonstrates LRASM’s Surface Launch Capabilities
 
Lockheed Martin recently conducted a successful controlled flight test of the Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) surface-launch variant from the Self Defense Test Ship at Pt. Mugu Sea Range, California.
     
Lockheed Martin recently conducted a successful controlled flight test of the Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) surface-launch variant from the Self Defense Test Ship at Pt. Mugu Sea Range, California.
Archive Lockheed Martin picture: Successful boosted test vehicle flight demonstrating LRASM missile egress, flight with existing Mk-114 ASROCK booster and Mk-41 VLS canister design.
     
This was the third successful surface-launched LRASM test, proving the missile’s ability to load mission data using the modified Tactical Tomahawk Weapon Control System (TTWCS+), align mission data with the moving ship and launch from the MK 41 Vertical Launch System (VLS). During the test, LRASM exited the VLS launcher, cleanly separated from its Mk-114 booster and transitioned to the cruise phase. The missile successfully flew a pre-planned low-altitude profile collecting aerodynamics agility data while enroute to its pre-determined endpoint.

“This successful flight test demonstrates Lockheed Martin’s readiness to answer the U.S. Navy’s need for new anti-surface warfare capabilities as part of the ‘distributed lethality’ concept,” said Scott Callaway, LRASM Surface-Launch director at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. “This LRASM flight test from a U.S. Navy surface ship VLS highlights the successful collaboration between Lockheed Martin and the U.S. Navy.”

To support this test, Lockheed Martin invested internal funds to provide an operational LRASM and to refurbish the Navy’s Self Defense Test Ship MK 41 VLS. This demonstration from a moving ship in a dynamic at-sea environment was a critical step in proving the maturity of the surface-launch variant. LRASM was also tested successfully from a ground-based MK 41 VLS “Desert Ship” in 2013 and 2014. Integrating LRASM with the VLS will provide every Aegis destroyer and cruiser with a long-range, survivable anti-surface warfare distributed lethality capability.

The surface-launch LRASM variant was built on the same production line as JASSM, JASSM-ER and LRASM air-launch weapons, and delivers the same long-range, precision capability. With maturity of the MK 41 VLS integration demonstrated, Lockheed Martin will continue testing on other surface ship applications, including topside, deck-mounted launchers.
     
Video: Interview on LRASM during Sea Air Space 2016
     
The first vertical launched LRASM test took place in September 2014.

Navy Recognition reported during the SNA show in January that LRASM could potentially come with land attack capability. While this capability is not part of the current (OASuW increment I) set of requirements (increment II requirements have not been released yet), we were told that a software update would provide LRASM with such capability. This is because LRASM is based on the AGM-158 JASSM (Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile) standoff land attack cruise missile.

The LRASM is a long-range subsonic cruise missile designed for better range and survivability than current anti-ship weaponry. This missile development program is a joint effort of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Naval Air Systems Command and the United States Air Force.

To learn more: Link to LRASM Long Range Anti-Ship Missile technical datasheet
 

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